Category Archives: books

Authors Answer 136 – Living in a Book

There’s a meme that says this:
“Narnia fans: We want to go to Narnia.
Harry Potter fans: We want to go to Hogwarts.
Hunger Games fans: We’re good.”

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Ever want to give up your life and transport yourself into the book you’re reading? Just completely start a new life and become someone new, living in a new place. It’s quite likely a lot of people do. One of the great things about reading books is the ability of the readers to lose themselves in the book. Some are great to live in, others not. What would we choose?

Question 136 – If you could live in any book, which one would you choose?

Eric Wood

Game of Thrones? To live in dark times where I’d probably die? No thanks. Love the books, don’t want to live there. Harry Potter? To be a wizard would fun, most definitely. Maybe in Terry Brooks’s world in “Kingdom For Sale, Sold“. The main character lives in today’s world but finds a portal to a magical kingdom. I like…

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Authors Answer 110 – Book Trailers

I haven’t exactly seen a lot of book trailers either.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Movies have trailers, right? Why not books? Well, they do. Some authors have trailers made for their books. But what exactly are they like? And should authors make them? This week, we talk about book trailers.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 110: Have you ever made a book trailer? If so, share it! If not, what would you like to do for your trailer?

Tracey Lynn Tobin

I have not! In fact, until pretty recently I’d never even heard of a book trailer and had no idea how someone would go about making one. It was an odd concept to me when I first heard about it. If I did do a trailer for “Nowhere to Hide“, however, it would definitely be super-dramatic – the kind of trailer that blinks in and out of different scenes of the various characters looking horrified/ready for battle. And it would end with a shot of…

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Authors Answer 103 – Top Influencing Books

Still not really very sure about this one.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Authors have many influences, and it’s something we’ve talked about before. However, we never did focus on the books themselves. Authors tend to also be avid readers, and a lot of the books we read will influence us, even if it’s subconsciously. But which ones have the strongest influence on our writing and other areas?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 103 – What do you consider to be the book that has influenced you the most?

H. Anthe Davis

I can’t point to any book that has influenced me sufficiently for this.  If I had to point at anything at all, it would be an anime series — Revolutionary Girl Utena — which fascinated me during my formative teen years and continues to help me get past some of my mental hang-ups.  No books, though; they’re all just part of the big past pile.

Jean Davis

Goodness, there are so many, and the…

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Authors Answer 102 – Graphic Literature

This reminds me of a few graphic novels on my to-read list.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Comic books and graphic novels are very popular. Both children and adults read them. There are comics for children, comics and graphic novel for adults. Although they are filled with pictures, they encourage people to read. But are they literature?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 102 – Do you consider comic books and graphic novels to be legitimate forms of literature?

Linda G. Hill

I’ve never actually read one, but why not?

Elizabeth Rhodes

Yes. They are legitimate storytelling mediums with their own styles. The presence of illustration does not change this. Comics have a history of not being taken seriously, but I don’t think anyone who still holds on to this view has taken a look at a comic or graphic novel from recent times. The mediums have come a long way.

D. T. Nova

Graphic novels, absolutely so.

There’s more of a continuum than a sharp definition of distinct categories, so whether…

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Authors Answer 101 – Books That Make Us Laugh

I can’t recommend Thing Explainer strongly enough.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Everyone loves a good laugh. There are some funny books out there, but not all of them make us laugh out loud. It takes a special book to make us laugh. The art of comedy is difficult to be successful in. An author who can make the reader laugh has a certain talent. But what we find funny may not be funny for someone else. So, what do we find funny?

laughingQuestion 101 – Which books have made you laugh?

H. Anthe Davis

I don’t read humorous books on purpose, so they sort of have to ambush me with the laughs, and I can’t really remember any off the top of my head.  Terry Pratchett’s stuff amuses me, yes, but it doesn’t make me laugh out loud.  Usually it’s some quirk of character interaction that does it, and I don’t know that any book has done it in a while.

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The Anime Adventures of the Little Prince

When US network Nickelodeon was fairly new, they were basically “the international children’s network”, so of course a Japanese anime based on a French children’s book fit right in.

The Adventures of the Little Prince may have actually been the first anime I ever watched, now that I think about it.

Heh, I didn’t remember it saying it wasn’t based directly on the book right there in the opening credits. Of course, serious adaptation expansion is kind of a given.

Continue reading The Anime Adventures of the Little Prince

Authors Answer 99 – That Annoying English Class Question

Also, I’d be too busy looking for the flying pigs to actually notice what students were saying about it.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

When we were in English class in school, I’m sure we all dreaded that one question that we were always asked. What is that question? Of course, we never liked to decipher the hidden (or obvious) meaning that the author is trying to tell us. But what happens if our books are being dissected in English class?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 99 – If something you wrote was read by an English class, how do you think they would answer this common question: What message is the author trying to convey?

Paul B. Spence

That there is hope.

D. T. Nova

I guess I’ll go with my still-unpublished first novel.

I imagine that a common answer to that question would be “The system is broken, but the will to change it for the better is unbreakable.” Alternately the more simplistic “Queer people can be heroes, and organized religion can be destructive.”

Elizabeth Rhodes

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