Tag Archives: literature

Authors Answer 102 – Graphic Literature

This reminds me of a few graphic novels on my to-read list.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Comic books and graphic novels are very popular. Both children and adults read them. There are comics for children, comics and graphic novel for adults. Although they are filled with pictures, they encourage people to read. But are they literature?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 102 – Do you consider comic books and graphic novels to be legitimate forms of literature?

Linda G. Hill

I’ve never actually read one, but why not?

Elizabeth Rhodes

Yes. They are legitimate storytelling mediums with their own styles. The presence of illustration does not change this. Comics have a history of not being taken seriously, but I don’t think anyone who still holds on to this view has taken a look at a comic or graphic novel from recent times. The mediums have come a long way.

D. T. Nova

Graphic novels, absolutely so.

There’s more of a continuum than a sharp definition of distinct categories, so whether…

View original post 910 more words

The Semi-Ironically Named Nippon Animation

No discussion of Japanese adaptations of western works could possibly be considered complete without mentioning Nippon Animation. They nearly singlehandedly made anime based on classic literature into a genre of its own.

Their longest-running meteseries is World Masterpiece Theater,  which Hayao Miyazaki worked on some series from. Among the many classics adapted to anime series were Heidi, Anne of Green Gables, Tom Sawyer, and The Swiss Family Robinson.

Heidi, Girl of the Alps was actually famous enough to be referenced in the Japanese version of Earthbound about 20 years later, replaced with the Beatles song “Yesterday” in the English localization. (Because “Hai” means “Yes” and it was basically “fill in the blank with a standard yes/no prompt”.)

(So, anime endings having weird visuals goes back at least as far as 1974.)

Continue reading The Semi-Ironically Named Nippon Animation

Authors Answer 98 – Why Did We Have to Read That in School?

I may have lucked out by not having to read The Grapes of Wrath.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Last week, we talked about books we enjoyed reading in school. Now, we’re going to talk about those that we didn’t like. For many people, reading books in school was far from fun. We had to interpret the books in ways that we never imagined, and it just made it less enjoyable.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 98 – What book did you read in school that you didn’t really like?

Cyrus Keith

You know you’re asking me to remember something I probably stuffed into a mental trash can almost forty years ago, right? There were a couple we started on, that I couldn’t even get through the first chapter without my eyes bleeding. They were long, winding, literary classics of some kind, and I was bored to tears from the opening lines.

C E Aylett

I don’t really remember, to be honest. I didn’t get on well at school and couldn’t wait to…

View original post 887 more words

Authors Answer 97 – Memorable School Reads

Better late than never.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

You either love or hate English class in school. When reading books, you’re asked to interpret them in ways you would never think of. What does the author mean? Does that blue curtain mean something? Or is it just a blue curtain? Sometimes, it’s enough to cause students to hate reading. But there are some books that stand out to us and become favourites.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 97 – What book did you read in school that you loved?

Paul B. Spence

Hmm. I read lots of books while in school. For school? Le Morte D’Arthur was always a favorite.

D. T. Nova

James and the Giant Peach comes to mind. Later on, The Odyssey.

Elizabeth Rhodes

Not a book, but a play. Once I gave Romeo & Juliet a serious chance I loved it. Knowing it’s not a love story at all went a long way toward appreciating the story…

View original post 944 more words

Authors Answer 96 – Required Reading in English Class

For the record, in the context of this question I interpreted “modern” to mean “newer than much of what is currently included”.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Welcome to September. Last month, we had an interesting month for Authors Answer, and the final story was The Personality Dealer. The winner was a tie! Gregory S. Close and Eric Wood won that one.

This month, we’re focusing on education. Not only that, we have three new contributors to welcome! So, say hello to Cyrus Keith, C E Aylett, and Beth Aman. We’ll begin with their answers.

This week, we’re looking at English class in school. There are a lot of novels that are required reading in class, but we don’t always see what we really want to read. So, what do we think should be read?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 96 – What modern novel do you think should be included in high school English class?

Cyrus Keith

Define “Modern.” For me, that could include anything written since 1916. So, with that definition in mind, I’m thinking the book in…

View original post 915 more words