Category Archives: books

The Anime Adventures of the Little Prince

When US network Nickelodeon was fairly new, they were basically “the international children’s network”, so of course a Japanese anime based on a French children’s book fit right in.

The Adventures of the Little Prince may have actually been the first anime I ever watched, now that I think about it.

Heh, I didn’t remember it saying it wasn’t based directly on the book right there in the opening credits. Of course, serious adaptation expansion is kind of a given.

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Authors Answer 99 – That Annoying English Class Question

Also, I’d be too busy looking for the flying pigs to actually notice what students were saying about it.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

When we were in English class in school, I’m sure we all dreaded that one question that we were always asked. What is that question? Of course, we never liked to decipher the hidden (or obvious) meaning that the author is trying to tell us. But what happens if our books are being dissected in English class?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 99 – If something you wrote was read by an English class, how do you think they would answer this common question: What message is the author trying to convey?

Paul B. Spence

That there is hope.

D. T. Nova

I guess I’ll go with my still-unpublished first novel.

I imagine that a common answer to that question would be “The system is broken, but the will to change it for the better is unbreakable.” Alternately the more simplistic “Queer people can be heroes, and organized religion can be destructive.”

Elizabeth Rhodes

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The Semi-Ironically Named Nippon Animation

No discussion of Japanese adaptations of western works could possibly be considered complete without mentioning Nippon Animation. They nearly singlehandedly made anime based on classic literature into a genre of its own.

Their longest-running meteseries is World Masterpiece Theater,  which Hayao Miyazaki worked on some series from. Among the many classics adapted to anime series were Heidi, Anne of Green Gables, Tom Sawyer, and The Swiss Family Robinson.

Heidi, Girl of the Alps was actually famous enough to be referenced in the Japanese version of Earthbound about 20 years later, replaced with the Beatles song “Yesterday” in the English localization. (Because “Hai” means “Yes” and it was basically “fill in the blank with a standard yes/no prompt”.)

(So, anime endings having weird visuals goes back at least as far as 1974.)

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Authors Answer 98 – Why Did We Have to Read That in School?

I may have lucked out by not having to read The Grapes of Wrath.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Last week, we talked about books we enjoyed reading in school. Now, we’re going to talk about those that we didn’t like. For many people, reading books in school was far from fun. We had to interpret the books in ways that we never imagined, and it just made it less enjoyable.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 98 – What book did you read in school that you didn’t really like?

Cyrus Keith

You know you’re asking me to remember something I probably stuffed into a mental trash can almost forty years ago, right? There were a couple we started on, that I couldn’t even get through the first chapter without my eyes bleeding. They were long, winding, literary classics of some kind, and I was bored to tears from the opening lines.

C E Aylett

I don’t really remember, to be honest. I didn’t get on well at school and couldn’t wait to…

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Authors Answer 97 – Memorable School Reads

Better late than never.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

You either love or hate English class in school. When reading books, you’re asked to interpret them in ways you would never think of. What does the author mean? Does that blue curtain mean something? Or is it just a blue curtain? Sometimes, it’s enough to cause students to hate reading. But there are some books that stand out to us and become favourites.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 97 – What book did you read in school that you loved?

Paul B. Spence

Hmm. I read lots of books while in school. For school? Le Morte D’Arthur was always a favorite.

D. T. Nova

James and the Giant Peach comes to mind. Later on, The Odyssey.

Elizabeth Rhodes

Not a book, but a play. Once I gave Romeo & Juliet a serious chance I loved it. Knowing it’s not a love story at all went a long way toward appreciating the story…

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Authors Answer 96 – Required Reading in English Class

For the record, in the context of this question I interpreted “modern” to mean “newer than much of what is currently included”.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Welcome to September. Last month, we had an interesting month for Authors Answer, and the final story was The Personality Dealer. The winner was a tie! Gregory S. Close and Eric Wood won that one.

This month, we’re focusing on education. Not only that, we have three new contributors to welcome! So, say hello to Cyrus Keith, C E Aylett, and Beth Aman. We’ll begin with their answers.

This week, we’re looking at English class in school. There are a lot of novels that are required reading in class, but we don’t always see what we really want to read. So, what do we think should be read?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 96 – What modern novel do you think should be included in high school English class?

Cyrus Keith

Define “Modern.” For me, that could include anything written since 1916. So, with that definition in mind, I’m thinking the book in…

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Authors Answer 75 – Re-imagining Fairy Tales

Despite most of them not being as old as they are commonly thought, fairy tales include many of the most archetypal stories.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

I hope everyone enjoyed the special April Fools edition of Authors Answer last week. It wasn’t true at all. We aren’t writing those stories.

This week, we move on to some more creativity. Fairy tales are popular stories, many have been made into Disney movies (and changed so kids can actually watch them). But are we satisfied with how they’re written?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 75 – If you could take any fairy tale and rewrite it as a full-length novel, which would it be and how would you change it to suit your style?

Paul B. Spence

Puss-in-boots, with a neopanther.

In all seriousness, I think I already have. I was strongly influenced by Rudyard Kipling’s Mowgli stories. Rikki-tikki-tavi has some bearing on the last book of my current series. Does Kipling count as fairy tales?

Maybe a twisted version of Sleeping Beauty, with a vampire?

Who knows, not really my thing.

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Authors Answer 74 – What We Are Working On Now

Whoa, barely managed to get this reblogged before the day was over.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Are you curious about what we’re writing? We’re all writing something, whether they’re novels or children’s books. We have some great things planned for you to read. I hope you really enjoy what we’re going to be publishing in the near future.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 74 – Can you tell us about a future book that you’re working on?

S. R. Carrillo

I’m excited to be working on a futuristic, feminist, freaky, queer western set in the clouds where worlds are ruled by demons and horses are fueled by fire.

Elizabeth Rhodes

With my recent blending of crime and science fiction, I want to try more genre blending. How about sci-fi/romance? Bodice rippers in space? Sounds like fun. Stay tuned.

H. Anthe Davis

In the War of Memory Cycle, the protagonists have faced off against malevolent necromancers, fanatical armies, and even the direct focus of a wicked god!  But can they handle….high…

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Authors Answer 62 – Our Favourite Created Characters

Really interesting answers this week.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Isn’t choosing your favourite character out of all the characters you’ve created like saying which of your children you like the best? Is it unfair? Well, we’re not talking about that, but we are going to talk about who we think is our favourite. This question comes from Authors Answer contributor Eric Wood.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 62 – Who is your favorite character that you created (either for a book/story or just because)?

Linda G. Hill

That’s a tough one. I love most of my characters – it’s hard not to when I know them so intimately and understand what they’ve been through. Even the bad ones! I’d have to say one of my favourite characters is Drommen, a chronic public masturbator from my “Scenes from the Second Seat on the Right” series on my fiction blog. After a year, it turned out he wasn’t such a bad guy after all. :)…

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Authors Answer 55 – Our Characters on Screen

Here’s one I hadn’t ever thought about before.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

We’ve made it big! We have a movie or TV contract signed, and we’re looking for actors to play our characters. In reality, the author probably has little say in who acts as their characters, but we do have our favourites. So, who would we choose?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 55 – If one of your stories were going to be made into a movie or TV series, who would you like to act as one of your main characters?

H. Anthe Davis

Oh man…  I’ve tried to fan-cast my own work many, many times, and have spent days paging through actor lists in search of people who look right, but it’s so dang difficult to appease myself.  A lot of the actors are too old to play my late-teens, or appeal to me by their personality but don’t fit the described look of the character, or could be perfect except they apparently…

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