Tag Archives: history

Thoughts on UFOs

When I was a teenager, I believed in a lot of fringe ideas that I’ve long since rejected by now.  Never really that strongly (it only took one major failed prediction for me to stop believing in psychic prophecy), but I was “pretty sure” about a lot of things where what I’d say now would range from “very unlikely” to “definitely not”.

I never really took the specific claims of ufologists as seriously as cryptozoology or even the Bermuda triangle, but I did read a lot of UFO books and think there was probably something unexplained that people were seeing. (Technically I’d still say there are unexplained UFOs; the belief I’ve rejected is the “all ordinary explanations have been ruled out” claim.)

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Authors Answer 45 – Real World Influences in Fiction

Though some of the events I refer to are maybe not quite what you’d call major and more national than global.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

When drawing influence for books, authors look in many places. They may get ideas from around them, from people they know, or from history. Today is the fourteenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center in New York. Events like this could have a big influence on writing.

Twin_Towers-NYCQuestion 45: It’s the anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon in 2001. How much do major world events influence your writing?

Linda G. Hill

I try not to state the date in my writing unless it’s necessary, so there aren’t many world events that actually make it into my novels. But from a politically correct, I suppose you could say, standpoint there has to be some sensitivity to such things. I guess you could say they don’t affect my writing in a direct way, but indirectly I find myself watching what I…

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Authors Answer 27 – History Changing Books

Books can change history. Even the ones that weren’t meant to.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Books throughout history have provided us with a window on the past. But have there been some books that have guided the course of history?  Well, of course! But here’s what our authors think. This week’s question comes from stomperdad.

HistorybooksQuestion 27: Do you think there are any books that have changed history?

Paul B. Spence

Changed history? No — once it’s happened, it’s happened. But changed the COURSE of history, yes. The easiest one that comes to mind is Stranger in a Strange Land.

S. R. Carrillo

Plenty! Forgive my brevity, but of course. I think my favorite of which would have to be Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.

Tracey Lynn Tobin

Changed history? Well that’s a strong notion, but I’m sure there probably are some books that have changed history. The Bible definitely springs to mind, as I’m certain history would have been a heck of a…

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E is for Enlightenment

E

It’s in the name of the blog, so it’s what I’m going to talk about today.

The word enlightenment can mean different things in different contexts, but for my blog it refers to the general definition of the word; the state of having knowledge that lets us understand things better. Anyone who learns is constantly improving; metaphorically, at least, we understand more than we did the minute before. I’m on the edge of enlightenment because solving even a major mystery usually just makes one aware of the next. And there’s nothing so perfect that it can’t be improved, after all.

The fact that The Enlightenment is also the name of the historical era where people finally started to figure things out is hardly unwelcome either, though. Though really, “historical era” is a questionable way to refer to it, because the age in which human knowledge is being increased at a rapid pace is hardly over yet.

Remember, Remember

Remember, remember the Fifth of November,

The Gunpowder Treason and Plot,

I know of no reason

Why the Gunpowder Treason

Should ever be forgot.

If you’re American like me, you probably know that from V for Vendetta rather than from any actual celebration, so please also remember that, unlike what V for Vendetta arguably implied and Anonymous definitely seems to think, Guy Fawkes was NOT fighting against tyranny (and definitely not an anarchist); he just wanted to kill the (Protestant) king and replace him with a Catholic head of state, which would have been very unlikely to lead to greater freedom for the English people at that time.

Guy Fawkes Day is, of course, supposed to celebrate Fawkes’s failure, not his attempt.