Make sure you’re registered to vote!

Rethuglicans have been illegally removing voter registrations in several states. Just one more reason for everyone else to vote Democrat. In fact, that alone should really be enough, but of course there are many others, like this:

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Ahoy, Me Hearties! Let’s talk about fan translations

Arr! Today be talk like a pirate day, so let’s talk about the fuzzy boundary between piracy, popularization, and preservation.

I’m all for creators being able to profit off their work, and not about to defend people who pirate content just to get out of paying retail price. And some media is a lot harder to justify pirating than others; I can’t think of an acceptable reason to pirate e-books, for example. (It’s also a bad idea because you’re more likely to get malware than the correct book.)

Continue reading Ahoy, Me Hearties! Let’s talk about fan translations

Authors Answer 152 – Writing Real People in Fiction

Though I’d be more likely to write alternate history than historical fiction.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

In high school, I read a book called The Wars, by Timothy Findley.  In this novel, the main character finds himself in a house with Virginia Woolf, who was a real person. In fact, she was an author. But she was appearing in a fictional novel. Naomi Novik has used real historical figures in her Temeraire series, as well. Books based on history and our real world quite likely will have real life characters. But what if we based the book on a real person? Who would we write about?

Question 152 – If you could write a fictional book about any famous person, living or dead, who would it be?

Gregory S. Close

I think I’d like to write a biography of Boudica. Celtic warrior queen fighting the fight against the might of Rome? Inspirational but tragic. I’d like to highlight more women in history, especially those in…

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Authors Answer 151 – Tough Criticism

You can’t please all of the people all of the time.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Authors will never please everyone. They have their fans, but also their critics. Check out some of the reviews on Amazon or Goodreads, and you’ll see some pretty negative reviews, including for books that are widely loved. Authors need to develop a thick skin when dealing with criticism, whether it’s from readers or publishers.

Question 151 – What is the toughest criticism given to you as an author?

C E Aylett

Do you know what? I can’t think of anything I’d consider really tough. I mean, sure, I receive ‘harsh’ critiques on workshop pieces but in a constructively harsh way, so i don’t really see that as tough. More like helpful. When I was a Noob I got a bitchy critique from someone but I soon found out that they had some rather ugly and deep psychological issues. It was such a long time ago I don’t even remember what…

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