Authors Answer 109 – Seasonal Writing

I think my muse is solar-powered.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Winter is coming. I’m not talking about A Game of Thrones. The seasons are changing. Weather and seasons can affect what people do and how they do them. But can seasons affect writing? That’s what we talk about this time.

img_3296Question 109: How do seasons and weather affect your writing?

H. Anthe Davis

I’ve spent the majority of my series in either autumn or winter (mostly winter now), so it’s not so much that the seasons affect my writing as that my writing affects my perceived season.  I live in the desert, okay, so it’s never actually winter here — not as I knew it when I lived in New England — but the story has kept New England-style winter trapped in my head for several years now, to the point that I actually forgot what season it was while I was talking to my boss once in October. …

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Authors Answer 108 – Bad Advice for Writers

It’s surprising how many “overused words to avoid” lists say you should never use them, when “never” belongs on such a list itself.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

A month ago, we talked about the best advice we’ve received as writers or authors. But what about the opposite? We don’t always receive great advice. Some of it is best to ignore. Some people just don’t know how to give advice that’s useful. Advice should be constructive, not destructive.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 108: What was the worst or least helpful piece of advice you’ve received about your writing?

Elizabeth Rhodes

Any kind of advice that hinges on “this is a rule of writing stories and should never be broken” is one I almost always write off. Writing rules are like rules of the English language: there are always exceptions, and these exceptions have been made by some of our favorite authors. Now, I don’t think I’m on the same level as George R. R. Martin, for instance, but I’d like to get there and saying “never ever ever write prologues because…

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My 10 Favorite Anime OPs of the 2000s

Or “the rise of the series that change OPs really often and artists fond of caps lock”.

10. Gurren Lagann, “Sorairo Days” by Nakagawa Shouko

I love the way the third opening actually uses the later part of the song.

Incidentally, it just edged out the opening for New Getter Robo. Even on this list Gurren Lagann overshadows what it homages.

Continue reading My 10 Favorite Anime OPs of the 2000s

Authors Answer 107 – Our Works in Progress

So I was wrong about the anxiety-being-over part.
I still need to get my focus back.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is a bit more than half over, so it’s a good time to talk about what we’re writing. Some of us are participating in NaNoWriMo, but many of us have our hands full with other works in progress. This week, we talk about what we’re working on.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 107: What are you working on now? Any works in progress?

Beth Aman

I’m working on getting my high fantasy published, (I’m in the pits of query letters) and I’m about to start writing a contemporary about an extraordinary bookstore, which is for NaNoWriMo.

Jean Davis

We are just over halfway through NaNoWriMo and I have so many works in progress. I’m currently attempting to focus on finishing a YA sci-fi novel, along with book four of The Narvan, a couple short stories, and rewriting a silly fantasy novel from years ago that is in desperate…

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Authors Answer 106 – What Authors Learn

Of course I’m also learning, the hard way, just how much harder revision is for me than writing the first draft.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Authors do a lot of research. They need to learn a lot of things when they’re writing about something that they don’t know a lot about. However, authors don’t just learn from research. They can learn from experience and it’s not always about any subject. It could be about themselves or their craft.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 106 – What are some of the most interesting things you’ve learned while writing, whether from experience or research?

Elizabeth Rhodes

For Jasper I looked up the culture and citizen mentality of North Korea. It may seem a little far-fetched to apply a foreign country’s ideals to an American city, but I wanted to get a feel for that kind of regime. I found someone’s travel journal from when they were a tourist in North Korea, and found it fascinating. I hesitate to compare the experience to a comedy film like The Interview, but the…

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