Authors Answer 103 – Top Influencing Books

Still not really very sure about this one.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Authors have many influences, and it’s something we’ve talked about before. However, we never did focus on the books themselves. Authors tend to also be avid readers, and a lot of the books we read will influence us, even if it’s subconsciously. But which ones have the strongest influence on our writing and other areas?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 103 – What do you consider to be the book that has influenced you the most?

H. Anthe Davis

I can’t point to any book that has influenced me sufficiently for this.  If I had to point at anything at all, it would be an anime series — Revolutionary Girl Utena — which fascinated me during my formative teen years and continues to help me get past some of my mental hang-ups.  No books, though; they’re all just part of the big past pile.

Jean Davis

Goodness, there are so many, and the…

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Donald Trump is the worst candidate for President in US history

I really don’t like to get political on this blog, but one candidate has crossed at least a dozen lines too many. Make no mistake, Trump’s policies are bad, his words offensive, his business expertise highly exaggerated in addition to being irrelevant even if true, and of course there’s the whole “bragging about being able to get away with sexual assault” thing.

Last night, when asked whether he would concede should he lose the election (and it definitely appears that he will not win), he didn’t say that he would. Whether the loser concedes has no actual effect on the winner becoming the President, but the lack of respect for both his opponent and democracy itself it would indicate is, as Clinton said then and there, horrible.

The real issue, the true danger caused by Trump’s utterly baseless claims of the election being rigged and especially if he fails to concede after losing, is that his supporters could conceivably join him in refusing to acknowledge Clinton as the President. In other words, Trump being a crybaby who won’t admit defeat could become a threat to the peaceful transfer of power, and absolutely no good can possibly come of that.

Authors Answer 102 – Graphic Literature

This reminds me of a few graphic novels on my to-read list.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Comic books and graphic novels are very popular. Both children and adults read them. There are comics for children, comics and graphic novel for adults. Although they are filled with pictures, they encourage people to read. But are they literature?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 102 – Do you consider comic books and graphic novels to be legitimate forms of literature?

Linda G. Hill

I’ve never actually read one, but why not?

Elizabeth Rhodes

Yes. They are legitimate storytelling mediums with their own styles. The presence of illustration does not change this. Comics have a history of not being taken seriously, but I don’t think anyone who still holds on to this view has taken a look at a comic or graphic novel from recent times. The mediums have come a long way.

D. T. Nova

Graphic novels, absolutely so.

There’s more of a continuum than a sharp definition of distinct categories, so whether…

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Authors Answer 101 – Books That Make Us Laugh

I can’t recommend Thing Explainer strongly enough.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Everyone loves a good laugh. There are some funny books out there, but not all of them make us laugh out loud. It takes a special book to make us laugh. The art of comedy is difficult to be successful in. An author who can make the reader laugh has a certain talent. But what we find funny may not be funny for someone else. So, what do we find funny?

laughingQuestion 101 – Which books have made you laugh?

H. Anthe Davis

I don’t read humorous books on purpose, so they sort of have to ambush me with the laughs, and I can’t really remember any off the top of my head.  Terry Pratchett’s stuff amuses me, yes, but it doesn’t make me laugh out loud.  Usually it’s some quirk of character interaction that does it, and I don’t know that any book has done it in a while.

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Authors Answer 100 – Taught By an Author

At least one of these authors (Asimov) has at least written books containing writing advice, which is probably the closest we’re going to actually get to being taught by them.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

One hundred! This is the one hundredth Authors Answer. One hundred weeks of questions and answers! Some of us have been doing this for all one hundred weeks, and some of us are newer. But this is a big number to achieve. I had no idea it would go this long. So, for this week’s question, we thought about who can teach us to write better. Which author would we love to be our teacher?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 100 – If you could take a writing class taught by any author, who would it be?

Cyrus Keith

Louis L’Amour. His descriptions were so brilliant, and he was so prolific a writer, if I could bottle just a little of what he had, I’d be better off.

C E Aylett

Probably Tracy Chevalier. Or Stephen Donaldson. But for vastly different techniques and styles. Mmm, if it came to a toss up..? Can we…

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The Anime Adventures of the Little Prince

When US network Nickelodeon was fairly new, they were basically “the international children’s network”, so of course a Japanese anime based on a French children’s book fit right in.

The Adventures of the Little Prince may have actually been the first anime I ever watched, now that I think about it.

Heh, I didn’t remember it saying it wasn’t based directly on the book right there in the opening credits. Of course, serious adaptation expansion is kind of a given.

Continue reading The Anime Adventures of the Little Prince

Authors Answer 99 – That Annoying English Class Question

Also, I’d be too busy looking for the flying pigs to actually notice what students were saying about it.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

When we were in English class in school, I’m sure we all dreaded that one question that we were always asked. What is that question? Of course, we never liked to decipher the hidden (or obvious) meaning that the author is trying to tell us. But what happens if our books are being dissected in English class?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 99 – If something you wrote was read by an English class, how do you think they would answer this common question: What message is the author trying to convey?

Paul B. Spence

That there is hope.

D. T. Nova

I guess I’ll go with my still-unpublished first novel.

I imagine that a common answer to that question would be “The system is broken, but the will to change it for the better is unbreakable.” Alternately the more simplistic “Queer people can be heroes, and organized religion can be destructive.”

Elizabeth Rhodes

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