The Anime Adventures of the Little Prince

When US network Nickelodeon was fairly new, they were basically “the international children’s network”, so of course a Japanese anime based on a French children’s book fit right in.

The Adventures of the Little Prince may have actually been the first anime I ever watched, now that I think about it.

Heh, I didn’t remember it saying it wasn’t based directly on the book right there in the opening credits. Of course, serious adaptation expansion is kind of a given.

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Authors Answer 99 – That Annoying English Class Question

Also, I’d be too busy looking for the flying pigs to actually notice what students were saying about it.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

When we were in English class in school, I’m sure we all dreaded that one question that we were always asked. What is that question? Of course, we never liked to decipher the hidden (or obvious) meaning that the author is trying to tell us. But what happens if our books are being dissected in English class?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 99 – If something you wrote was read by an English class, how do you think they would answer this common question: What message is the author trying to convey?

Paul B. Spence

That there is hope.

D. T. Nova

I guess I’ll go with my still-unpublished first novel.

I imagine that a common answer to that question would be “The system is broken, but the will to change it for the better is unbreakable.” Alternately the more simplistic “Queer people can be heroes, and organized religion can be destructive.”

Elizabeth Rhodes

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The Semi-Ironically Named Nippon Animation

No discussion of Japanese adaptations of western works could possibly be considered complete without mentioning Nippon Animation. They nearly singlehandedly made anime based on classic literature into a genre of its own.

Their longest-running meteseries is World Masterpiece Theater,  which Hayao Miyazaki worked on some series from. Among the many classics adapted to anime series were Heidi, Anne of Green Gables, Tom Sawyer, and The Swiss Family Robinson.

Heidi, Girl of the Alps was actually famous enough to be referenced in the Japanese version of Earthbound about 20 years later, replaced with the Beatles song “Yesterday” in the English localization. (Because “Hai” means “Yes” and it was basically “fill in the blank with a standard yes/no prompt”.)

(So, anime endings having weird visuals goes back at least as far as 1974.)

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Authors Answer 98 – Why Did We Have to Read That in School?

I may have lucked out by not having to read The Grapes of Wrath.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Last week, we talked about books we enjoyed reading in school. Now, we’re going to talk about those that we didn’t like. For many people, reading books in school was far from fun. We had to interpret the books in ways that we never imagined, and it just made it less enjoyable.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 98 – What book did you read in school that you didn’t really like?

Cyrus Keith

You know you’re asking me to remember something I probably stuffed into a mental trash can almost forty years ago, right? There were a couple we started on, that I couldn’t even get through the first chapter without my eyes bleeding. They were long, winding, literary classics of some kind, and I was bored to tears from the opening lines.

C E Aylett

I don’t really remember, to be honest. I didn’t get on well at school and couldn’t wait to…

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Japanese X-Men openings

No need for very much explanation here. This video is the openings (and eyecatches) from the Japanese dub of the 90’s X-Men cartoon.  The songs are “Rising” and “Dakishimetai Dare Yori Mo” by Ambience.

The animation here is so much better than in the actual episodes.

How did Cable get so prominent in the first opening? He was only in like three episodes. And the Brood were in less than that.

Authors Answer 97 – Memorable School Reads

Better late than never.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

You either love or hate English class in school. When reading books, you’re asked to interpret them in ways you would never think of. What does the author mean? Does that blue curtain mean something? Or is it just a blue curtain? Sometimes, it’s enough to cause students to hate reading. But there are some books that stand out to us and become favourites.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 97 – What book did you read in school that you loved?

Paul B. Spence

Hmm. I read lots of books while in school. For school? Le Morte D’Arthur was always a favorite.

D. T. Nova

James and the Giant Peach comes to mind. Later on, The Odyssey.

Elizabeth Rhodes

Not a book, but a play. Once I gave Romeo & Juliet a serious chance I loved it. Knowing it’s not a love story at all went a long way toward appreciating the story…

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