Ahoy, Me Hearties! Let’s talk about fan translations

Arr! Today be talk like a pirate day, so let’s talk about the fuzzy boundary between piracy, popularization, and preservation.

I’m all for creators being able to profit off their work, and not about to defend people who pirate content just to get out of paying retail price. And some media is a lot harder to justify pirating than others; I can’t think of an acceptable reason to pirate e-books, for example. (It’s also a bad idea because you’re more likely to get malware than the correct book.)

Continue reading Ahoy, Me Hearties! Let’s talk about fan translations

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How to Survive in a Mecha Anime or Manga

I’m not dead, but I would be if I wound up in a mecha setting and didn’t follow these rules.

1. Don’t mentor a younger pilot.

2. If you must break rule one, don’t be cooler than your protege.

3. Don’t fight anything powered by a black hole.

Continue reading How to Survive in a Mecha Anime or Manga

Authors Answer 152 – Writing Real People in Fiction

Though I’d be more likely to write alternate history than historical fiction.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

In high school, I read a book called The Wars, by Timothy Findley.  In this novel, the main character finds himself in a house with Virginia Woolf, who was a real person. In fact, she was an author. But she was appearing in a fictional novel. Naomi Novik has used real historical figures in her Temeraire series, as well. Books based on history and our real world quite likely will have real life characters. But what if we based the book on a real person? Who would we write about?

Question 152 – If you could write a fictional book about any famous person, living or dead, who would it be?

Gregory S. Close

I think I’d like to write a biography of Boudica. Celtic warrior queen fighting the fight against the might of Rome? Inspirational but tragic. I’d like to highlight more women in history, especially those in…

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Authors Answer 151 – Tough Criticism

You can’t please all of the people all of the time.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Authors will never please everyone. They have their fans, but also their critics. Check out some of the reviews on Amazon or Goodreads, and you’ll see some pretty negative reviews, including for books that are widely loved. Authors need to develop a thick skin when dealing with criticism, whether it’s from readers or publishers.

Question 151 – What is the toughest criticism given to you as an author?

C E Aylett

Do you know what? I can’t think of anything I’d consider really tough. I mean, sure, I receive ‘harsh’ critiques on workshop pieces but in a constructively harsh way, so i don’t really see that as tough. More like helpful. When I was a Noob I got a bitchy critique from someone but I soon found out that they had some rather ugly and deep psychological issues. It was such a long time ago I don’t even remember what…

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Authors Answer 150 – Creative Evolution

I sometimes wonder if I’ve changed in ways I’m not aware of too.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Writing is a skill that changes over time. The more an author writes, the better they become at their craft. Reading our first stories remind us how far we’ve come. And quite often we cringe and hide that story so no one can see it. This time, we’re talking about how we’ve changed over the course of our writing careers.

Question 150 – How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?

H. Anthe Davis

I think I’ve most evolved in my editing skill — my ability to detect bad material and fix it. I’ve also loosened up a bit in my textual diction and am slowly figuring out how to not torture the English language, as I was critiqued once. I used to use more complex constructions and more high-falutin’ words in places where they weren’t necessary, or were in fact counter-productive to the flow and tone of the narrative. I’m…

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