Tag Archives: writers

Authors Answer 150 – Creative Evolution

I sometimes wonder if I’ve changed in ways I’m not aware of too.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Writing is a skill that changes over time. The more an author writes, the better they become at their craft. Reading our first stories remind us how far we’ve come. And quite often we cringe and hide that story so no one can see it. This time, we’re talking about how we’ve changed over the course of our writing careers.

Question 150 – How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?

H. Anthe Davis

I think I’ve most evolved in my editing skill — my ability to detect bad material and fix it. I’ve also loosened up a bit in my textual diction and am slowly figuring out how to not torture the English language, as I was critiqued once. I used to use more complex constructions and more high-falutin’ words in places where they weren’t necessary, or were in fact counter-productive to the flow and tone of the narrative. I’m…

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Authors Answer 144 – The Writer’s Ego

You need to have confidence in your work, but whether it’s good or bad to trust your own judgment of it above everyone else’s is partially dependent on it’s own quality.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Everyone has an ego, right? The ego is an interesting thing. Some people have a big ego and think very highly of themselves. Others are the opposite, and don’t have much of an ego. They still have an ego, though. It has to do with self-esteem as well as self-importance. But we usually hear about the self-importance part. So, how does it affect authors? This week’s question is from Eric Wood.

Question 144 – Does having a big ego help or hinder a writer?

C E Aylett

I’m sure there have been cases of both — the genius who knows it to be so and is uncompromising in taking advice from others ‘beneath’ him/her and wins out in producing a masterpiece and the humble author who listens openly to suggestions and takes on board what fits with what s/he’s trying to accomplish.

However, in most acknowledgements in most novels, credit…

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Authors Answer 117 – Difficult and Easy Scenes to Write

And this question wasn’t so easy to answer either.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Writing isn’t always easy. Of course, writing isn’t easy! There are some aspects that are more difficult than others, but it really depends on the author. Some people have a talent for writing action, while others do really well with dialogue. So, what do we find easy and difficult to write?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 117 – What kind of scenes do you find the easiest and most difficult to write?

Eric Wood

The scenes I most enjoy writing are those from a child’s perspective. Perhaps because I have 2 of my own. Perhaps because I’m more like them than I can admit. The scenes I find most difficult to write tend to be ones about violence and death. Because of that I don’t typically include those in my writings. Naturally you won’t find those on my blog or in my children’s stories. I have written a few violent short stories, but I…

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Authors Answer 100 – Taught By an Author

At least one of these authors (Asimov) has at least written books containing writing advice, which is probably the closest we’re going to actually get to being taught by them.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

One hundred! This is the one hundredth Authors Answer. One hundred weeks of questions and answers! Some of us have been doing this for all one hundred weeks, and some of us are newer. But this is a big number to achieve. I had no idea it would go this long. So, for this week’s question, we thought about who can teach us to write better. Which author would we love to be our teacher?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 100 – If you could take a writing class taught by any author, who would it be?

Cyrus Keith

Louis L’Amour. His descriptions were so brilliant, and he was so prolific a writer, if I could bottle just a little of what he had, I’d be better off.

C E Aylett

Probably Tracy Chevalier. Or Stephen Donaldson. But for vastly different techniques and styles. Mmm, if it came to a toss up..? Can we…

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