Tag Archives: authors

Authors Answer 70 – Who Should Be a Guest on Authors Answer?

To be fair, we were all answering the version of the question that starts with “if you could”.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

In the past, we’ve had a guest join Authors Answer for a month (Michael J. Sullivan). Last year, for our one year anniversary, we had several join (Janny Wurts, Brian Staveley, Andrew Rowe, Baye McNeil, Erica Dakin, and Amy Morris-Jones). But what if we start inviting more authors to be guests? Well, this is actually something I will be doing, hopefully each guest writing for a month each. But who do we think should be guests? Of course, many of our choices are unrealistic, so these are our dream guests.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 70 – If you could request any author to be a guest on Authors Answer, who would it be and why?

S. R. Carrillo

Michelle Browne! She is such a “mother hen” type when it comes to taking in writers of all walks of life and giving them a place to share their geekery. At the same time…

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Authors Answer 64 – Authors’ Childhood Dream Jobs

I remember one time I asked my first grade teacher how to spell paleontologist, and she didn’t know either.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Did authors always want to grow up to be authors? Some did, of course. But most probably didn’t think of writing as a profession that they wanted to do. There’s a wide variety of jobs, and most probably wanted to do something entirely different.

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Question 64 – When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Linda G. Hill

I always wanted to be a veterinarian, probably because I read All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot at a young age. But come high school I took physics instead of biology because I couldn’t stand the thought of dissecting a frog. By that time I was much more interested in human psychology anyway. Though I never went to university to study what makes people do the things they do, psychology continues to fascinate me.

Allen Tiffany

First a scuba diver, then a soldier…

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Authors Answer 62 – Our Favourite Created Characters

Really interesting answers this week.

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Isn’t choosing your favourite character out of all the characters you’ve created like saying which of your children you like the best? Is it unfair? Well, we’re not talking about that, but we are going to talk about who we think is our favourite. This question comes from Authors Answer contributor Eric Wood.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 62 – Who is your favorite character that you created (either for a book/story or just because)?

Linda G. Hill

That’s a tough one. I love most of my characters – it’s hard not to when I know them so intimately and understand what they’ve been through. Even the bad ones! I’d have to say one of my favourite characters is Drommen, a chronic public masturbator from my “Scenes from the Second Seat on the Right” series on my fiction blog. After a year, it turned out he wasn’t such a bad guy after all. :)…

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Authors Answer 57 – Stop Asking Me That Question!

This one’s about questions we don’t like answering.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Authors are asked a lot of questions. They may have interviews, they may talk at conventions or book signings, or they may talk with friends and family. Well, sometimes, we get questions we keep hearing over and over again, or are too complex to answer briefly.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 57 – What is one question you hate answering about your writing that acquaintances ask you?

Tracey Lynn Tobin

There are just SO MANY questions that people ask that make writers writhe with rage. I could probably make one hell of a list if given the time. That said, I can honestly say that the one question that enrages me the most is the one people inevitably ask when they find out I have a written, published book: “Is it, like, in book stores?”

I always bite my tongue and try to answer as politely and honestly as possible, but this question makes…

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Authors Answer 32 – Controversy

And a couple of other things, now that I think about it.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Controversy. Adding just a little can make a story quite provocative. Some people will demand the books be removed from the library, others will love it. There are so many controversial subjects that could offend someone. But who will write about controversial subjects? Some authors would rather avoid that.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 32: Do you write about any controversial topics?

S. R. Carrillo

I like to think the topics I write about aren’t very controversial, but honestly they prolly are (hm, let’s see – sex, violence, queer stuff, antiheroes, drug abuse, twisted families, incest, etc.). Like, my friggin debut novel is about a gay angel and the lost little demon who always wants to eat him. Can’t say I have any regrets, though – the weirder, the wronger, the more I fall in love with the story. Mwahah.

Tracey Lynn Tobin

Honestly? I try to avoid controversial stuff, unless I feel very…

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Authors Answer 29 – Tapping the Inner Child

I hope I fall into the category of writers who can write teenagers well.

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There are many books from the point of view or featuring children and teenagers.  But children and teenagers don’t write those books. Adults do. This week’s question comes from aclmohle.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 29: How do adult authors write from the point of view of children/teenagers so well?

Paul B. Spence

You’re assuming that they do write well from that viewpoint, which I haven’t seen be the case, most of the time. However, at least you can say, well, they were kids once, right?

S. R. Carrillo

I think it’s all a matter of remembering, very well, even while realizing how ridiculous it all was, the experience of being younger, feeling trapped, thinking you know everything, fancying yourself invincible… It’s easy to tell when an adult is trying too hard – recall the shittiness and freedom of being a teenager to write like one well. Otherwise… it’ll show.

Tracey Lynn Tobin

This…

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Authors Answer 28 – Publishing Paths

There sure are a lot of publishing options.

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A big publishing contract with a major publishing house is a dream for many authors. But a lot of authors are going another way these days, completely bypassing the publishers and doing it themselves. This week’s question is from RedTheWriter.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 28: Vanity Publishing? Indie Publishing? Self Publishing? Traditional Publishing? Author Publishing? What is the difference? What do you recommend?

H. Anthe Davis

For me, self-publishing through KDP worked best, because I’d been pitching my first book at publishers and agents for years without success and just wanted to get it out there so I could move on to the second book.  As a hobbyist I don’t mind that it’s not lucrative, though I do have this dream of pitching the finished series to publishers later and them going ‘yes, of course, brilliant!’ for a traditional print run.  Considering they’d scrap my covers for their own, though, I’m not sure…

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Authors Answer 26 – Impossible Love

Interesting question, with lots of interesting (if non-specific) answers.

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Have you ever read a book and found one character you wished were real? A character you’d want to date? I’m sure many people have fallen in love (not real love, of course) with a character. Someone they thought would be a wonderful person if they actually existed.  Well, this intriguing topic comes to us from stomperdad. Paul B. Spence and Linda G. Hill are absent for this week.

Cupid! Cupid!

Question 26: If you could date any fictional character, who would you date?

H. Anthe Davis

I’m not the relationship type, but I am very fond of certain characters and would like to hang out with them, if only they weren’t all action-fantasy types and thus generally the epicenters of rampant death and violence.  I mean, I guess if I was in their world and had magical powers myself, it would be feasible, but then there’s the fact that most…

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Authors Answer 25 – One Hit Wonder or Prolific Author?

Even if I am just now getting started, I want to eventually have written a decent number of books, regardless of popularity.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

Harper Lee had a huge hit, To Kill a Mockingbird. It was the only book she published (thought recently, she announced a new book). But it was massively popular. Then there are other authors who seem to write a couple books a year. Many write without much recognition, but they keep going. This week’s question comes to us from the rather prolific commenter stomperdad.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 25: Would you rather write one book that’s hugely popular or many books with little recognition?

Linda G. Hill

Oooh, difficult question. Although I’d love to have a book that’s hugely popular, I love the writing part of making novels. So I think I’ll have to go with the latter.

…ask me again after I’ve published something. 😛

Caren Rich

Seriously, I just want to be published.  Writing a popular book would be amazing.  I don’t think it’s necessarily better than having a string…

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Authors Answer 21 – The Ultimate Goal

I think it’s good to have your “ultimate goal” higher than your actual expectations, as long as you can avoid confusing the two.

I Read Encyclopedias for Fun

We’re in it for the money, right?  Or is it to become famous?  Or do we want a bunch of fans chasing us down to our book signings?  Or nothing like that?  We all have a goal in mind for our writing.  This week’s question comes from H. Anthe Davis.

154px-Billets_de_5000Question 21: What is your ultimate goal with your writing?  Fame, fortune, changing the world?

Linda G. Hill

Again, I don’t seem to have a choice in the matter: I’m a novelist. I have a hard time writing anything between 500 and 50,000 words. Being a novelist I suppose if any of it’s going to be read, and read widely (which is what I hope) fame and fortune are the consequence. I want neither. What I would like is to be able to write, to be read, and to be financially comfortable… and have at least enough money to travel…

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